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ACE2017 Special Sessions

The Economic Society of Australia (NSW Branch) invites you to ACE 2017 the 46th Australian Conference of Economists. Our theme this year is “Economics for Better Lives” and sessions will consider issues such as inequality and poverty, financial regulation, taxation reform, education reform, the economics of mental health, utility regulation, transport economics, infrastructure, regional trade agreements, international migration flows, international aid and development, the role of behavioral economics the economics of populism, and macroeconomics in a low interest rate world. We are planning a special session on professional ethics for economists, and the future of the profession.

This is the premier Australian conference for economists in universities, public policy, business and finance. Each year we welcome many overseas economists including this year’s keynote speakers Carol Graham and Kip Viscusi. Generations of young economists and students have presented papers and connected with others at the conference, launching their careers. Our policy panels with distinguished academic and government economists have introduced new ideas and shaped public policy.

We look forward to welcoming you to our conference in Sydney in July 2017.

Paul Oslington
Professor of Economics and Dean of Business, Alphacrucis College
Chair of the ACE2017 Organising Committee

   
 

Practical Issues in Market Design

This session will cover some of the key live market design policy issues in Australia, from electricity retail, smart networks to vocational education and training.

 

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Ethics in Economics

This session will look at issues facing economists relating to their potential influence on policy and the potential for code of conduct for economists

 

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Infrastructure

Abstract information to follow

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Higher Education Policy

Higher education is economically crucial, not just because it is a large Commonwealth budget item, but because its effectiveness is vital for Australian productivity, and well-being more generally.  Our panel will offer ideas for reform that might move us beyond the impasse of clashing interests and ideologies that has marked recent Australian debates over higher education.

 

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The Economics of Care

Care and household reproduction are critical activities of the economy with important implications for wellbeing and productivity. They are also activities predominantly performed by women. Esther Boserup’s seminal work on women in economic development in the 1970s first brought women’s labour into the frame of economic analysis. Since then leading feminist economists such as Marilyn Waring, Nancy Folbre, Julie Nelson, Diane Elson, Bina Aggarwal, Rhonda Sharp and many others have contributed to the development of a robust and large body of literature that has redefined how we think about the economy, what we count as work, and what we value as productive. The promotion of well-being for all has often been at the centre of this literature. In more recent years feminist economists have also turned their attention to care markets and the emergence of the ‘care economy’ – particularly in aged care, child care and disability care. In this panel three leading scholars on the economics of care will address contemporary theoretical and policy questions.

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Financial Markets (ABE)

The panel will cover topical domestic and global economic issues of relevance to financial markets, including the impact of the policies of the Trump Administration, rising global interest rates, Brexit, China’s growth outlook, unwinding QE, potential growth, Australia’s transition in the post mining boom world, and the lurch towards protectionism.

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Inequality

Abstract information to follow

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History of Australasian Economics

The history of Australian economics has been attracted by distinguished contributors such as Craufurd Goodwin and Peter Groenewegen.  This session considers the latest contribution to the discussion by Alex Millmow, and its significance for the challenges facing the economics profession in Australia. 

 

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Emerging Issues on CBA in Regulation

This session will discuss cost benefit analysis (CBA) issues with a particular emphasis on issues relating to regulation

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Medium-Term Policies for Economic Growth

International Trade and Economic Growth | Major Drivers of Economic Productivity | Human Capital and the Australian Future

 

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Women in Economics

Abstract information to follow

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Short-Term Economic Management and Economic Growth

Nominal Income Targeting versus Inflation Targeting in Advanced and Emerging Economies | Growth, Natural Rates and Policies | Rebalancing Monetary and Fiscal Policies

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Behavioural Economics and Public Policy

Each panelist will discuss their insights on how Behavioural economics can effectively contribute to public policy. This will be followed by a more informal discussion between panelists around the topic. 

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Economics of Mental Health

Mental health is one of the major challenges facing Australia, but one which has so far been neglected by economists.  In this session we would like to move beyond existing studies of the impact of mental health problems on the economy to consider incentive structures for participants in the mental health system, and how they can be improved.  Well informed investments in improving incentives may have a bigger payoff for those who struggle with mental illness than investments in new medical facilities.

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