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ESA National Economic Panel Polls


 

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Author's Name: Kym Anderson
Date: Tue 12 Feb 2019

Kym Anderson, AC

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Professor Kym Anderson (past panellist)

Kym Anderson is a Professor of Economics at the University of Adelaide and at ANU’s Crawford School of Public Policy. He was on extended leave at the research division of the GATT (now WTO) Secretariat in Geneva during 1990-92 and at the World Bank’s Research Group in Washington DC as Lead Economist during 2004-07. He is a Fellow of the AAEA, AARES, AAWE, ASSA, APPS and CEPR. He is also Chair of the Board of Trustees of the Washington DC-based International Food Policy Research Institute, and President of the Policy Advisory Council of the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research.

Subject Area Expertise

International Trade and Agricultural Economics

Website

www.adelaide.edu.au/directory/kym.anderson and http://publicpolicy.anu.edu.au/crawford_people/content/staff/acde/kanderson.php


Responses (5)


Economics teaching - micro before macro - February 2017

Poll 15

"It is more effective to teach an introductory course in micro-economics first before an introductory course in macro-economics."

 

Strongly agree

10


2016 US Election - November 2016

Poll 13

"Hillary Clinton is likely to be the superior US presidential candidate for the Australian economy and for Australia."

 

Strongly agree

10


The Brexit - impact on UK citizens - July 2016

Poll 9

"Assuming it is implemented, Brexit will deliver net economic benefits, on average, to UK citizens within its first 5 years."

 

Uncertain (neither agree nor disagree)

10

It depends heavily on what policies the UK changes and what trade and investment agreements it strikes with the EU27 and with other trading partners.


China services boom for Australia? - April 2016

Poll 6

"As the Chinese economy makes its transition from investment-led to consumption led growth, the Australian service sector which currently accounts for around 20% of total exports, will produce a second 'Chinese economic windfall' for Australians."

 

Agree

7

We will have more competition from other exporters of services than we have had from other exporters of iron ore and coal (where our marginal costs have been well below even today's low prices of those resources). And that will be more so the more Australia's real exchange rate is held up by our relatively high real interest rates.


Penalty Rates Reform - November 2015

Poll 2

"Aligning Sunday penalty rates for hospitality, entertainment and retailing industries with the current levels for Saturday, as proposed in the Productivity Commission's draft report, will lead to more employment and greater availability of services in these industries on Sundays."

 

Strongly agree

10