National Economic Panel

 


 

ESA National Economic Panel Polls


 

About

Polls

Panellists

Got an Idea?

Author's Name: Sue Richardson
Date: Tue 12 Feb 2019

Sue Richardson AM

Emeritus Professor Sue Richardson

Sue Richardson obtained her degrees from the University of Melbourne and La Trobe University. She has worked at La Trobe, Adelaide and Flinders Universities. At Flinders, she was Director of the National Institute of Labour Studies. She has been on a number of boards and government advisory bodies, including the Industry Commission and the Essential Services Commission of SA.

From 2010 - 2019 she was a part-time member of the Fair Work Commission, sitting on its minimum wage panel. Her areas of research are the labour market, income distribution, wellbeing and poverty. She is a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia and was President of that Academy and a Member of the Order of Australia.

Sue is Emerita Professor at Flinders University and Adjunct Professor at the University of Adelaide

Subject Area Expertise

Poverty, income distribution, labour markets, skills development and shortages, migration, ageing and climate change.


Share this with your friends


Responses (1)


Social Distancing Measures, May 2020

Poll 38

"The benefits to Australian society of maintaining social distancing measures sufficient to keep R<1 for COVID-19 are likely to exceed the costs"

 

Strongly agree

7

If the infection rate was widespread and growing, I think that individuals would themselves take steps to distance and isolate themselves, regardless of what the rules were. I think it is very unlikely that people would behave, as consumers and as workers, as they did before the pandemic, if there was widespread transmission occurring. That is, a return to 'normal' is not an available option.

Strongly agree

7

If the infection rate was widespread and growing, I think that individuals would themselves take steps to distance and isolate themselves, regardless of what the rules were. I think it is very unlikely that people would behave, as consumers and as workers, as they did before the pandemic, if there was widespread transmission occurring. That is, a return to 'normal' is not an available option.